Would Spurs have won the Premier League with Frank de Boer?

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For all the clubs who consider themselves bigger than the Foxes this triumph represented a massive missed opportunity.

In the end, only Mauricio Pochettino’s Tottenham side were still in the hunt for the trophy before it went to the King Power Stadium, Andrea Bocelli serenade and all.

 

But 2016 could have been the year Spurs won the Premier League under Frank de Boer if comparing the statistics of Pochettino and Ronald Koeman’s time at Southampton are anything to go by.

In 2014, De Boer looked destined for Spurs after winning four league titles in a row with his first managerial gig at Ajax.

The Dutchman unknowingly damaged his chances of landing the job when he irked the Spurs board by publicly revealing the interest in him from White Hart Lane which in turn opened the way for Pochettino, with his Premier League experience, to pip him to the position.

Pochettino v Koeman

Pochettino had just steered Southampton to their highest ever league finish (eighth) and points total (56) after a season-and-a-half in charge.

The Saints boasted a talented team with the likes of Schneiderlin, Lambert, Lallana, Shaw, Clyne, Chambers and Lovren all within its ranks. The Argentine left Southampton with a win ratio of 38.33% during his tenure.

Ronald Koeman filled the gap left by Pochettino after three years in charge of Feyenoord where he had patched up some of the damage done to his managerial reputation following disastrous stints at Valencia and AZ Alkmaar.

He faced an exodus of star players on arrival, leading to a load of laughs when he tweeted “Ready for #training!” and a picture of an empty training ground on the first day of pre-season.

 

But even with the departures of Rickie Lambert, Luke Shaw, Adam Lallana, Lovren, and Callum Chambers, Koeman managed to soundly recruit and then, against the odds, bettered Pochettino’s previous season by finishing higher (seventh) and also setting a new record points tally (60) for the club.

This season, Koeman’s Southampton again lost key players in Morgan Schneiderlin and Nathaniel Clyne but still beat the previous year’s performance, finishing sixth with 63 points.

After two seasons in charge, Ronald Koeman’s win ratio at Southampton is 47.78% – which is 9.45% better than Pochettino’s record at the club.

Statistically, it can be argued that Koeman is the better manager and even Southampton fans will tell you they wouldn’t swap the Dutchman for the Argentine now.

Koeman v De Boer

Frank de Boer and Ronald Koeman both managed title challengers in the Dutch Eredivisie with Ajax and Feyenoord respectively between the 2011/12 and 2013/14 seasons.

Big spending PSV Eindhoven made it a three horse race during this period.

In these three campaigns, Koeman’s Feyenoord finished second and six points behind winners Ajax; then third and seven points behind winners Ajax; and finally, second again four points behind winners Ajax.

In league encounters between the two sides De Boer’s Ajax got the better of Koeman three times, with Feyenoord managing just one win and two draws.

Both clubs performed disappointingly in the domestic cups and European competitions over the course of the three seasons.

 

The general Dutch consensus seems to have always been that Frank de Boer is a manager with greater potential than Koeman and performances during this three year spell in the Dutch league seemingly back that belief up.

So here is the twisted logic: Koeman is statistically better than Pochettino by 9.45% when weighing up their consecutive spells at Southampton.

This means that maybe Koeman could have done better than Pochettino at Spurs as he did with the Saints, converting his better win ratio which would have resulted in gaining an extra seven points this season.

That, however, would still be three points behind Leicester.

But if – as the Dutch evidence suggests – Frank de Boer is even better than Koeman, then could he have squeezed the extra points needed to be champions?

Did Spurs unknowingly throw away a Premier League title when they chose Pochettino over De Boer?

And if it’s not clear by now, Everton should definitely go and put “The Farmer” to work.

The Author

Robbie Muldoon

2 thoughts on “Would Spurs have won the Premier League with Frank de Boer?

  1. what an absolutely ludicrous article! i will never get back the 2mins spent reading this drivel

  2. I gave up once I realised exactly where it was going – a facile comparison between Koeman and Pochettino, followed by an even more facile comparison between Koeman and de Boer.

    Maybe the whole of Southampton FC is still benefitting from the work Pochettino did there. And just because Koeman adjusted to the BPL it doesn’t mean that de Boer would!

    As for the Southampton fans not swapping Koeman for Pochettino now – where to even start? Primarily, the Saints fans still have issues with Pochettino because they still cannot accept why he left them. He left because their board got rid of the chairman that Pochettino had stressed he had a personal loyalty to, to top which the board also refused to assure him that the fine young team he had developed wouldn’t be sold from under him. That was important to him as this is exactly what happened to him at Espanyol. And he was right, the team was sold. But rather than blame the board, Saints fans are determined to ignore all this and paint Pochettino as a disloyal villain who left them for purely mercenary reasons. And this article suits that narrative. Never mind that Arsene Wenger, of all people, has stated a belief that Southampton would have went on to win the CL if they had kept Pochettino and his squad together – so if they had retained the chairman and therefore Pochettino and his squad they may actually be doing far better than Koeman and his! Let’s just create a facile narrative.

    These people should have to pay for the time they have stolen with their half-wit articles!!! ?

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